Guest User
1/18/2005
I have a horse barn that has some condensation. In the barn that does not matter however I want to put a ceiling in the tack room and fear that the condensation will damage the sheathing. What is the proper way to install this ceiling to prevent water damage by the condensation?
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
1/18/2005
Underlayment under the metal roof covering would have helped deal with this issue especially in a livestock operation. If possible I would try to install one under the rafters over this area. there are a couple of reinforced types. You may even want to consider a foil faced foam core made by Environmentally Friendly Products. Make sure the bottom exits over the fascia as a drain and that the eave and ridge is open to breath/ventilate. Tape all the openings and joints. Good Luck
Guest User
1/19/2005
I am putting a metal roof over the top of three inches of styrofoam laid on plywood, roughly 4,500 sq. ft. of roof. It's a gable roof over a bungalow. How do I handle airflow under the metal? I have heard that the color (green, brown, red etc) fade and the undercoat shows after 15 years. Can you advise me on that? Thanks.
Guest User
1/20/2005
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
1/20/2005
First thing to do is check with the manufacturer of the roof you have selected and get their recommendations. Second they should carry a product approval which will indicate if it has been tested and approved for this type of application. The chalk and fade of a paint system is dependant on a number of things; quality of paint, pigment and thickness more than it is colour. Ask for a PVDF paint system that has 75% resin content. They come with a 30 year warranty. As to the air flow. I assumethat this is a vaulted ceiling so there is no attic. The roof covering will need to be set up off the insulation as the code calls for a minimum of 1" in the US and 1 1/2" in Canada. Additionally you will need strapping to fasten the roof covering to. Best strap the roof vertically over the rafters and then horizontally. Vented closure strip can be put in at the eaves and ridge, again ensure that it is a system designed and approved for this application. FYI, my company has a system for this in 5 differant profiles. Check it out at www.duraloc.com
Guest User
9/28/2007
I am in Kentucky and we get a moderately cold winter normally. I am building a concrete barn and planning to use a metal roof. I am planning to use treated plywood as decking on top of my trusses, felt paper on top of that and then the metal. The barn will not be heated and the eaves will be open and I will have a ridge vent. Will I have condensation issues? Is there a better way to prevent condensation.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
10/20/2007
Given your explanation, this should be fine.
Guest User
12/15/2007
I plan to use spray foam directly under the space sheeting with a R60. The walls will have a R30. It is my understanding that moisture is caused when warn air meets cold air. If they don't meet...no moisture. The same basic principal causes rain. If you do not have a moisture barrier or not enough foam insulation in your walls...it will "rain" in your walls where the cold air meets the hot air. Result over time...the bottom of the studs rot. A hotel in Florida had a moisture problem in their pool area. They sprayed the roof with foam...no more moisture problems. You have to make sure that the foam does not contain formaldehyde and does not produce any off-gassing. Years ago they were actually making "Foam Homes." They were so efficient...you could actually heat them with a...are you ready for this..."a light bulb." I hope this is of some help and will help you expand your possibilities.
Guest User
8/23/2008
Your bigger concern is the proper fasteners when using treated decking.
Todd Miller
Isaiah Industries, Inc.
8/26/2008
Thanks, all, for your input.
Aaron Scurlock
The Best in Polymer Roofing Soutions
8/25/2009
Michael, Spray foam insulation meets the point of diminishing returns. R 60 is a fallacy and a number acquired only by adding the accumulative R factor per inch of said SPF. SPF (closed cell) will stop 85% of thermal loss in the first inch, 85% of the remaining 15% within the second inch, and 85% of the remaining 2.25% by the third. R 60 cannot truly be achieved, but many foamers will tell you it will in order to sell you 10 inches of foam.
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