Guest User
6/14/2002
I had a new roof installed over a gambrel truss system at my camp/summer home last year. When I opened the building this spring I found pine needles and tree debris on the second floor down the center line of the building. The interior of the camp is unfinished and I am sure that it was blown in through the ridge vent. Should there be a screen or membrane that prevents debris from blowing in? Ho can I tell if the ridge vent was installed properly?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
6/16/2002
Most ridge vent systems have very small openings for airflow. In addition, many have a filter inside the vent to help prevent debris from getting in. I would be concerned that, if debris is entering, water could too as well as insects, etc. The proper installation of the vent depends upon what type of vent was used and what sort of roofing is installed. Is this a metal roof? Can you contact anyone (the contractors or the manufacturer of the vent or roofing) and pose these questions to them? In any event, check the "joint" netween the vent and the roofing. It should be sealed in some fashion -- either with sealant or, with some metal and tile roofs, a metal or foam closure strip.
Guest User
1/9/2003
I also share your concern. I had a metal roof installed on a new garage. The metal ridge vent (as one stands inside the building looking up to the vent) shows a 3-4" gap for ventilation. There is no mesh to prevent any debris or bugs, etc.. from entering through the vent. The roofer told me to simply stuff foam in the vent to prevent anything from entering. This sounds counter productive to the free flow of air. Is their a "book" solution? It seems I'm going to be tacking my own screening on the inside of the vent. Fortunately no water gets in.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
1/9/2003
It sounds as it you have a vertical rib smooth finished metal roof that may have been fitted with agricultural vents designed to keep the rain out but not the bugs or needles etc. Provided he used and installed a proper closure strip between the vent and the metal roof then there are a couple of ways to correct the problem. Check a roofing wholesaler as some carry a 6" wide roll of fiberglass that is not very dense. You can slide this into a "T" top type vent. If you can get at the slots a very good fix buy a small roll of self adhesive fibreglass joint tape for drywall. The mesh size is the same as a proper vent specification and will keep the bugs out. After applying spray lightly with a paint which will seal it and protect it. Good Luck.
Guest User
3/6/2003
I to am having problems with my metal roof ridge venting. There is about a 1 1/2 -2" gap to allow for natural venting. Putting a foam strip in the gap would not allow for good venting ( I would assume ). Most of the time all is fine, but once or twice every winter we have high winds, and dry snow, which pacs into this space. When the snow melts, I get some water entering the living space,can this be stopped by placing a mesh type material into the gap?
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
3/6/2003
First I would double check that you have a residential vent and yes you should be able to put in some Vent mesh as manufactured by GAF to help slow the air down. Normally if an attic is vented properly and the ceiling insulated properly, a any fine snow that gets in evaporates before it melts. Have a look at your eaves ventilation now and the insulation. Hope this helps.
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