what gauge of roof for a residential home

Guest User
11/15/2004
We are installing metal roofing on our new construction house. We live in Colorado (lots of high-altitude sun) at 9,000 ft. Snow load of 40 lb/wind load of 85. We want a panel profile suitable for residential aesthetics, yet tough enough to withstand the elements at our location. Would like to have hidden fasteners as well. and What kind of venting is best? I was told cobra venting. What are your professional recommendations for gauge / profile / and venting? Many thanks, Diane
Guest User
11/15/2004
The panel profile we like comes in 29 and 26 gauge but it lacks the option for kynar finishes. Instead it offers an acrylic finish. I'm concerned that our strong, high altitude sun will chalk and fade this finish in just a few years -- yet this profile is only one of 2 with this manufacturer that has conceled fasteners - another important consideration. Should we sacrifice color longevity for structural / maintenance reasons? It seems like this company is the only manufacturer around these parts. which should we opt for? conceled fasterners or better color retention? I wish we didn't have to choose. thanks so much for your help. Diane
Guest User
11/15/2004
Hi Diane, Thanks for researching metal roofing. The Metal Roofing Alliance is a coalition of competing metal roofing manufacturers. Our membership produces a wide variety of products and types. Our role is to provide information and education so that consumers can make wise choices. Frankly, metal roofing is not indifferent from most other products -- you get what you pay for. In other words, there is generally a correlation between cost and product attributes / qualities. Panel gauge and width kind of go hand in hand. Generally, wider panels need to be of heavier gauge. However, of course, the thicker the metal and the narrower the panel, then you can well-imagine that the manufacturer has higher metal costs and you can imagine what that does to the final material cost. As far as venting, I would strongly suggest that you use the venting system which is suggeste dby the manufacturer of the roofing product you choose. In other words, choose your roofing first and then choose an appropriate vent. I am going to email direct to you with a Guide to Metal Roofing which my company has written.
Guest User
11/15/2004
Perhaps the manufacturer can tell you about the life expectancy of the acyrlic coating but generally it will be fairly short. At that point, you have the zince and/or aluminum coating on the steel to protect against corrosion but that, too, will wear thinner over time. I would suggest using this website to find a manufacturer of a product you like and then qinuiring with them for local availability details. Most metal roofing is shipped over distances rather than produced and obtained locally. I like concealed fasteners -- they just make sense to me for most products. Look for products which meet the criteria established by the Metal Construction Association for their Cerified Metal Roofing Panel program. This program covers both base metal quality and coating / finish quality.
Guest User
11/18/2004
Our roof is being replaced due to hurricane damage. Because of the roof pitch we are told our options are rolled shingle material or metal. Insurance will pay for shingle. Our contractor tell us a metal roof will cost $11,000(materials only) more than rolled shingle. He says labor is about the same. Does this sound accurate?
Guest User
11/18/2004
I am assuming that your roof is very low pitch. I cannot stress enough that, whether you choose metal, roll roofing, or something else, you must confirm with the manufacturer of the roofing that it is suitable for your roof pitch. It is against our antitrust bylaws (for a trade association) to discuss pricing in any fashion. I am sorry. Individual manufacturers, if contacted directly, can probably help with that. Also, there are many other types of roofing materials suitable for low pitches as well. I would not put much stock in anything your contractor says. Sorry.
Guest User
11/22/2004
I live in Florida and we were hit by Charley. We have gotten a few estimates for metal. One is Acralume 5 v metal with wood zak screws. What is 5 v metal and is this type of metal good. And what about wood zak screws. The other is solar shield metal also 26 gauge. They also say they will install a Fi-Foil radiant barrier what is this. Thank you for your help.
Guest User
11/22/2004
Hi Angela. I have never heard of Acralume and I cannot find anything on it through an internet serach. Ditto with "wood zak". However, 5V is a "generic" profile of through-fastened roofing sheets. It refers to profile only and does not have anything to do with base metal type or thickness nor with the coating that is on the metal. Solar Shield is an installer of metal roofing located in Florida. Just stating a fact here -- some unhappy past customers of theirs have posted here on this website before. Radiant barriers can help to keep attics cooler but the barrier must face an airspace in order to be effective -- if it is sandwiched between two roofing system materials, it will not be effective as a radiant barrier. Some manufacturers are using paint systems now which have special reflective pigments in them, for energy efficiency. Please spend some time on this website. Find some products you like. Contact the manufacturers and contact some experienced installers in your area. Look for products which meet or exceed requirements put forth by the Metal Construction Association in their Certification program.
Guest User
12/17/2004
Is a 26 guage material sufficient for a home in a hurricane zone(within a 1/4 mile of the beach). Also what is a Kynar finish and what does it do for the quality of the metal roofing.
Guest User
12/17/2004
Roof performance in terms of wind resistance is achieved through much more than just the metal thickness. Other factors include the profile (or shape) of the metal roofing panels, and the installation procedures. Most coastal areas, at least in real hurricane-prone areas, are requiring metal roof panels which have passed UL 580 or UL 1897 testing. This is strictly a performance test. I would suggest looking for products which have passed it and which meet any other code requirements in your area. There are, I am sure 26 gauge panels which have passed this testing and, I am also sure, 26 gauge panels which have not passed. Kynar is a trade name for a paint finish commonly used on metal roofing. Paint finishes are one method of providing beauty and corrosion resistance for metal roofing. There are other types of finishes as well. Kynars are widely respected as "top of the heap" in terms of paint finishes.
Mike Babcock
8/5/2006
Can you give a general ranking of the finishes and what the differences are? Also, the manufacturer page lists "bare metal", "pre-painted finishes", and "granular coatings". What are each of these and which are the best? Thanks for your help.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/5/2006
Please email to me at [email protected] I have an article I will send to you which covers all of that.
Guest User
11/26/2008
Please send me atticle you spke of regarding metal roofing
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/29/2008
Please email me at [email protected] and I will send it to you
Guest User
7/9/2010
can you also send me the article that covers of the finishes
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