Guest User
11/4/2004
We purchased a small log cabin that is a work in progress. It has only the log walls and metal roof, the rest is up to us to complete it ourself. Facts to consider: this is not a "kit" nor was it built by any contractor or home builder, only by the land owner and his neighbors. It is small 18' X 20', I don't know the gauge of the metal roof, nor the roof pitch. I do know that the center of the roof is 20' from the floor. This is located in a high moisture area (on Lake Cumberland,KY). We will not have an attic, only a bedroom will be in the loft part of the cabin. For insulation we plan on putting up 5" styrofoam panels under the metal roof in between the 2 X 6 studs, there will be a 1" air clearance in between the metal and styrofoam, then stapling house wrap as a moisture barrier over the styrofoam then putting up drywall or wood for the ceiling. We plan on installing 1 or 2 turbo air vents in the ceiling for ventilation. We are using the housewrap since we have an extra roll of it on hand. Since we now have seen condensation and dripping from the same metal roof over the porch area, we are concerned this will happen in the house. Our neighbors said that we will get condensation from the roof and that we should use regular fiberglass insulation (again they are not contractors). My concern is if we do get condensation and it drips in the insulation, then we will have mold and mildew problems, correct? Since we can not afford to hire someone with the expertise needed, I am hoping you will guide us in the right direction. Do our plans seem logical? Should we use the 5" styrofoam for insulation? Should we use the house wrap for a moisture barrier? Should the house wrap go up before or after the styrofoam? Should we install the turbo air vents? if so, how many? Do you have any other suggestions on the best way to complete this off prior to installing the ceiling? I appreciate any help you can provide. thanks.
Allan Reid
Dura-Loc Roofing Systems, Inc.
11/4/2004
Wow! At least you are asking the right questions now. I have to assume that currently the metal roofing is exosed. A proper vaulted ceiling assembly from the inside comprises of; ceiling finish (drywall), air barrier (10 mil poly), insulation, preferably roof deck, minimum 1" vented air space, moisture barrier and then roof covering. In looking at your assembly I would comment from the outside in as follows; You do not have a moisture barrier, the roof is not vented, the roof is probably not installed to allow an air movement vertivally and you are looking to install a breathable wall moisture barrier on the inside. The house wrap is useless on the inside. You need an air barrier. My suggeggestion is to treat it as a solid assembly at this point and consider having sprayed in place foam insulation applied directly to the underside of the roof metal. This will act as a moisture barrier on the outside an an air barrier on the inside provided you do not cut the inerior surface to open up the cells. You will not need to worry about venting and condesation, just heat transfer, however if you choose a proper contractor he will leave no air pockets. Make sure you get all your wiring, plumbing etc in place first. Hope this helps.
Guest User
11/10/2004
I have a vacation home “a Camp” on the river. We built the home about 10 years ago and it only has a wood burning stove for heat. We use the house maybe one weekend every month. The house is frame construction with T1-11 siding. The house sets about 2’ off the ground on cinderblock piers with no underpinning in case of high water. The roof is the corrugated galvanized tin. The tin is mounted directly to the rafters. We used the screws with the rubber gaskets to fasten it overlapping one and a half ridges as outlined in the directions. It has a ridge vent made to this type of tin and vents in each end of the attic. We never insulated the attic and the soffit is open all around the house. Oh it has a good pitch to it. I don’t recall right off hand but used prebuilt truss. Now the problem… I started noticing dark spots “mold” on the sheetrock inside the house. When I got in the attic I noticed that the roof had been leaking. I watched during the rain and it looks as if the water is coming in between the tin and running down until it his a cross support and drips on the sheetrock. Another problem is in the mornings when its cool outside then the sun hits the tin it condensates and drips causing the same problem. I also notice around the chimney when we have a fire going it condensates so bad that it is going to rot the walls out. Any help? Should I replace with sheeting and asphalt shingles? I notice some dampness in the corners of the house on the floor (Not from the roof but inside) I look under the house but find no signs of moister. Could this be because the floor is not instulated?
Guest User
11/10/2004
Scott, Unless I am mistaken, I think I gave you some input to this situation when you posed this question to me recently through the Ask The Experts site. If you have any additional questions or anything else, just contact me direct. Todd Miller [email protected] 1-800-543-8938 ext 201
Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.