Guest User
4/12/2004
We put standing seam on a 4:20 roof made of Premier SIPS. I'm nervous about how best to attach snow guards. If I glue the guards onto the metal, I'm afraid that the load will pull the roofing down. If I screw the guards through the metal and underlayment into the SIPS, I'm afraid that the screw holes will eventuallly leak and compromise the roof. The SIP panel manufacturer says go ahead and screw them on. What has been your experience? Thanks, avalanche prone in Colorado
Guest User
4/12/2004
Guest User
4/12/2004
If this is a true standing seam panel (and not a "corrugated" through-fastened panel), then I suggest looking for snowguards or a snowfence which attaches to the seams with special brackets. One type of bracket is called S5!
Guest User
4/14/2004
Thanks, Tod, I'm still concerned with the snow load pulling the entire metal roof down. One section of our roof actually slid down about a foot. I was told that there is only one screw holding each roof section from sliding down. Because of this, I am worried that by attaching snow guards either to the seams, or gluing them to the panel, the snow load will pull the metal roof panels from the roof. Maybe I do not understand what is holding the roof sections from sliding down the roof. Can you shed some light on this for me? Much thanks, jeff
Guest User
4/14/2004
Hi Jeff, I certainly do not know exactly how your roof was installed or even exactly what kind of roof you have. However, with a standing seam system, the panels are held in place using clips which do allow them to float with expansion and contraction. However, normally, one end of the panel, most usually the top end, is secured firmly with a couple of screws. I hope this helps.
Guest User
11/22/2006
Jeff, I have the same problem as you, One of my panels has slid out about a foot and would like to know how you corrected your problem Howard
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
11/25/2006
Panels need to be through-fastened (or "pinned") from one end, usually the top end.
Guest User
10/22/2010
We are in Alaska and have been getting 22-30 feet of snow a year and have finished installing snow stops on all our ribbed metal roofing. The currrent stops have been in place for the last two winters, were screwed through the high ribs in the roofing to the sheeting and have worked extremelty well in preventing our snow from burying our sidewalks and entrances.
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