Susan Barnes
10/16/2003
My husband & I are considering a metal roof for our new home which will be in south LA. We have heard that metal roofs may require yearly maintenance and that there is a possibility that the screws will back out. Is this true? What kind of maintenance is necessary to keep the roof in good condition? We are considering a dimensional shingle look. We are trying to comply with all energy star requirements and are not sure what we need to consider with the metal roof. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/16/2003
While I have heard of some "sheet" style metal roofing having issues with fasteners, most of today's products designed for residential use have fastening clips, joints, and expansion folds which allow for expansion and contraction without undue stress on the fasteners. A properly installed metal roof will require no regular maintenance. In areas subject to a lot of roof debris or airborne fungus, it may be desirable to wash down the roof on occasion. However, this is not required and not doing so will not damage the life or performance of a properly installed roof. When looking for a product, choose an established professional installation company and make sure you go see older jobs done with the product you're choosing. Talk to the property owners in order to build your confidence in the product and the installer. Some metal roofs are energy star rated. Generally, this will require a light colored roof or a roof with reflective pigment in its paint finish. Also, just from a practical standpoint, metal roofing shows good energy efficiency. This is especially so with some of the shingle style products which have little direct contact with the roof deck.
Guest User
10/27/2003
My husband and I are building our retirement home on the lake--3 floors, 6,000 sq.ft. under roof--beautiful architectural roof. We thought he had done our homework on metal roofs. However, last week our builder came up with another roofer who is some $10,000 cheaper than the one we were set to go with--having excellent references, in business longer, etc. Sounding fishy to us, we checked it out somewhat and learned one difference is partly due to the gauge of metal being quoted. We are now getting conflicting information on roofing requirements. Question: Our plans call for a Standing Seam Metal Roof (16 "). What gauge should be used? Also, what kind of decking (I don't know how to put this) needs to be applied before the metal roofing goes on (Oh, what goes under the metal roofing)? We will spend what we need to on our roof.--But, at this point, we don't know who to believe when it comes to the roof (builder, roofers). And, we have to make a decision this week as to who will get the job so they can go ahead and order the roofing material. If you need more information, I can get that from my husband. Any information will be appreciated--We have no where else to turn. Thank you. Nina
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/30/2003
Hi Nina, Thanks for planning on a metal roof! I apologize for the delay in my response. i have been gone this week to attend our industry's major annual trade show, MetalCon. It was a great show. As far as choosing a contractor, sounds like you're doing some right things in terms of getting references, finding out how long they have been in business, etc. Also, go talk to their past customers and look at past jobs. Confirm that the actual installers for your roof are experienced. As for the product, make sure you know what product is being installed and who manufactured it. Call the two manufacturers and ask them for comparisons to the other products. If you can't even figure out who the manufacturer of a product is, I'd look for a different product by the way. As far as paint system, I strongly suggest a Kynar 500 / Hylar 5000 paint system. This is top of the line as far as paint systems used on standing seam. As far as base metal, look for minimum G90 galvanized or AZ 50 galvalume. As far as metal gauge, the smaller the number, the heavier the metal. Heavier metal, generally, is good. However, you can emboss and put strengthening ribs in lighter gauge metals for added durability and oilcanning resistance. Most steel standing seam will be 24, 26, or 28 gauge. Again, the lower the number, the thicker the metal. If you consider aluminum, look for minimum .032" thickness. As far as what goes under neath the metal, most residential standing seams will require solid decking such as plywood or OSB. Make sure that the product being installed on your roof is being put over whatever base its manufacturer specifies. On top of the decking, an underlayment should be installed. I suggest 30 pound felt covere dby red rosin paper or else just one of the new polyer based underlayments such as SharkSkin, RoofTopGuard, Tri-Flex, or Titanium. For a home of this magnitude, I suggest making sure that your roof will have no exposed fasteners in the panels or accessories. Feel free to call me at 1-800-543-8938 ext 201 if you have more questions. I will be in the office tomorrow. Good luck. I am sure you will love your new home.
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