Guest User
7/29/2008
I'm living in a house that was built in 1959. The main room has a vaulted ceiling, not really sure on the pitch. On the backside of the house there was an addition done that has a flat roof. There are also two side additions that have the same pitch as the main roof. Hope I haven’t lost you yet! I know that the house doesn’t have the best insulation, but it does have some, and unfortunately insulating it isn’t an option now. The house currently has one layer of asphalt shingles on the pitched roof, and rolled shingle on the flat part. The main roof is about 900 square feet, and the flat is about 600 square feet. I’m looking into putting on a metal roof and after reading a lot about it, it seems that the biggest concern is about moisture. I need to find out what the best way to install this would be. I have heard that I can lay felt down and then put the metal over that. I have also heard that I need to put down 1x4’s and then put the metal on that. I plan on leaving the existing shingles there. The current house does not have a ridge vent, so that is a concern of mine with the metal roofing. I will be putting a ridge vent on the metal roofing to help with ventilation, but what should I be concerned about? If I need to use the 1x’s, what kind of spacing is generally used, will this support weight from snow or someone walking on it. Please help me all that you can. Mike
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
7/30/2008
The main risk of condensation is from moisture inside the house. As we make houses tighter all the time, that moisture collects in the attic and condenses wherever dewpoint is reached. You mention adding a ridge vent. Is there opportunity for eave soffit vents too? That would allow you to vent the attic which would be great for any roof.
Guest User
7/31/2008
I do have one place that I can put a soffit. The house was home built and the vaulted ceiling has no attic, but the other half of the house does have an attic. The only places we are noticing water is on the side with the attic. This house has no ridge vent or soffit vent, could this be a cause for some of the problems?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
8/1/2008
Yes. Proper ventilation requires intake air and exhaust vents. A combination of soffit and ridge vents works well. A good source of basic ventilation principles info is www.airvent.com
Find a Contractor

Get Started Today

Take the first step to increasing the value of your home with a great looking, durable, fire resistant and energy efficient metal roof. Browse our list of qualified MRA Member Roofing Contractors in your area for a free consultation and estimate.