Older home, low pitch, tar and gravel roof

Guest User
2/17/2003
I have an older home that has a low pitch and a tar and gravel roof. Can I install a new roof system over this, or does it need to be torn off first?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
2/17/2003
There are more issues here than just the feasibility of going over the existing roof. Other issues include ventilation concerns, the low pitch issue, and structural weightloads. To answer your question, though, yes, there are many roofs which can go over your existing roof, often with the use of some sort of "recovery board" to msooth out the surface or battens to raise the new roof. However, once you pick out some product(s) which interest you, you need to talk with the manufacturers regarding additional issues including those I mentioned above.
Guest User
3/17/2003
Jim, I would be interested in what you decided re: a roof. RE: advice from the experts, I, too, have a low-pitch tar and gravel roof. The contractor wants to scrape the rocks off. lay on insulation, then lay on the vertical panels. I too have ventilation concerns since I have no attic (exposed woodbeam ceilings throughout) that are extremely energy efficient.
Guest User
3/17/2003
my exposed woodbeam ceiling is terribly energy INefficient! My heating/cooling bills are obscene and I keep the place at 62 degrees in the winter and 78 degrees in the summer.
Guest User
3/26/2003
I have recently moved to a home on the water (actually out on piers in the water) in South Bristol Maine. It has two main roofs, one which leaks with a very low pitch that appears to be tar (no gravel) and the other a high pitched roof with asphalt shingles that doesn't leak as far as I know but looks pretty marginal. These roofs are the collection system for rainwater which funnels through a downspout into a cistern, my only source of water. Amazingly enough, and in spite of a pretty primative filtering system, the water is perfect - no contaminates of any kind as determined by the State of Maine. I need advice since I've always lived in a standard house and don't know where to begin to figure this out. I need new roofs but don't know where to start and I can't afford to make a mistake. Thanks!
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
3/28/2003
On this website, you can investigate and learn about the many types of metal roofing that are available today. One thing you can do is select some products you like and then contact Customer Service at the manufacturers of those products in order to talk about your roofing needs in detail. The low pitched section, if done in metal, might be so low as to require a very particular type of vertical seam metal roofing which is either seamed after it's installed, or perhaps has a sealant in the seam. Again, the manufacturers could discuss this with you. As far as collecting water from the roof -- again, you will need to check with each manufacturer to gather their position on this subject. I do know that metal roofs are used for rainwater collection in many areas of the world. However, I am not sure that you will get anyone to ever officially "approve" the use of the collected water for drinking water. You can also use the Find A Contractor section of this website to locate experienced metal roofing contractors in your area.
Guest User
10/24/2003
Guest User
10/24/2003
It's been several months since anyone has posted to this subject. I am considering installing a metal roof over an existing tar and gravel roof as well. I was wondering if anyone has done this, and how successful was the project. Do you have any condensation problems with the metal roof. The tar & gravel roof we have is a vaulted ceiling on the interior of our home. I was wondering if it would be possible to add insulation between the existing tar and gravel roof and the new metal roof if 2x4' were screwed down to the existing roof , insullation placed betweent the 2x4's, and then the metal roof screwed down to the 2x4's? Any thoughts on this?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/24/2003
The new International Building Code requires a vented airspace of at least 1" depth on all such roof assemblies. Whatever you do, you need to make sure the structura can handle the weight of it. You may wish to consider hiring a structural engineer to take a look at things.
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