standing seam with exposed fastners?

Guest User
10/14/2006
I have a standing seam roof through screw fastner type. However, my roof also has exposed fastners on the ridge caps and also on the roof panels as they come close to the outside walls of house. Is this a true standing seam room? Also, I have sever oil-canning with this roof. In the summer the oil canning is very noticeable. Is this due to improper installation? Is this roof approved in a florida hurricane zone?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/14/2006
I think you have a through fastened roof, not a true standing seam. Please email pictures to me at [email protected]
Guest User
10/15/2006
Todd, thanks for responding. Today is sunday and I will be at house and upload and email some pictures this afternoon. Also, I am confused. Other posts have suggested that the through fastened roof is a type of standing seam roof versus the clip design. Please clarify. Also this house is in 140mph wind zone in FL. Where do I search to find if roof on my house meets this requirement. This house is new construction, started in 2005. Does my roof have to meet the upload pressure/testing of 140mph wind zone? If so, should the local building inspection department be required to ensure that it does?
Guest User
10/15/2006
Also, Todd the roof I have has an approved standard: UL 580 according to 1998, its class FF100, UL approved TGKX.529 roof deck construction. Will my local building department approve this roof in Escambia county, FL where its 140mph wind zone?
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/16/2006
There probably is confusion on these definitions. However, through-fastened products have overlaps between the sheets whereas standing seam have an actual raised interlocking seam of some sort, with hidden fasteners. Wind load ratings are based upon the individual panel and manufacturer and what uplift tests it has been tested at and passed.
Guest User
10/18/2006
Chris, without the benefit of the emailed pictures, perhaps I can offer some additional information as well: 1) By definition "standing seam" refers to a type of roofing panel that is attached to the roof substructure, primarily, with either a concealed clip or concealed fastener system. Typically, standing seam panels will have side ribs with heights of 1" up to 3" or so and usually spaced 12" to 24" apart. 2) By definition, "through fastened" panels are a type of roof or wall panel that is attached to the structure with exposed fasteners. These panels will typically have ribs 9" or 12" apart. The side lap of these panels is usually the same height as the other ribs in the panel. These side ribs will be 24" to 36" apart depending on the style of panel. Based on your description, if the only fasteners you see are located along the "eave" of your roof, then you most likely have a standing seam product. In Florida, due to the large wind load requirements, even standing seam panels will need to have exposed fasteners installed in order to strengthen the panels ability to resist the wind loads. The fasteners you refer to at the ridge cap are probably there to connect the ridge cap to the panel. This is fairly typical. If you look closely, you can probably notice fasters along the gable end of the roof as well used to attach the gable trim to the panel. If these are the only fasteners visible, again, it is probably a standing seam product on your roof. If you see 100's (perhaps 1,000's) of fasteners located everywhere on your roof then you probably have the through fastened panel product. I doubt it though. You mentioned "oil canning". Yes, poor installation can be a contributing factor for "oil canning" however many other factors can cause it as well. My experience wilth "oil canning" and your situation leads me to believe that the roof substructure is probably not very smooth( or "in plane" as refered to in the metal roof industry). Most residential roofs are not truly "in plane" because most residential roofs have shingles applied and the roof structure does not have to be as "in plane" for these products. However, with standing seam, because of the attachment method, the panel is forced to sit close to the roof substructure, and any "waviness" in the roof substructure will show through the panel as "oil canning". My bet is that is the issue with your roof. In regards to your testing questions and the 140 mph requirement. The State of Florida is very strict when it comes to metal roofing and it's ability to withstand the windloads. That helps you in that, more than likely, before the contractor ever built your house, they had to prove to the State that the roof could withstand the wind loads. If you know who the builder was, you should be able to get that data from him. He also should have information regarding the metal roof that you can use to further educate yourself about the product. Metal roofs are a great investment, you should study up on them so you can properly take care of it and reap the gain from the years of longevity that metal roofing can offer!
Guest User
10/19/2006
Thanks for responding. If you look at my roof in the hot summer sun, the oil canning is severe and uniform from the edge of the roof on each panel all the way to the top of the roof. This roof is a standing seam roof, but its the type that attaches to the plywood underneath through screws penetrating preformed slots on the panels. In my opinion, the severe oil canning is due to the installer screwing the panels too tightly every foot or so. Thus, when you look at roof from the street in the hot sun, the expansion of the metal between the screws causes the roof to "bubble" out-leaving a wavy appearance to the roof. It looks horrible. I believe that the standing seam roof attached by clips is far superior. Many clip-standing seam roofs in my neighborhood are beautiful and show no oil canning. Inaddition I discovered that my GC pulled the roofing permit, and hired an unlicensed roofer put the roof on. Also, I found out that the roofing product did not meet the 2004 florida building product approval when it was installed in October, 2005.
Guest User
10/20/2006
I appreciate your assesment and you could very well be right. The type of panel you have identified is generally known as a "nail strip" panel. Sounds like if the GC is still around they may have some "splainin'" to do. Good luck
Todd Miller
Classic Products, Inc.
10/21/2006
Okay
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