Guest User
3/28/2001
Hi--I just got the MRA videotape and saw that it said that in a lot of cases, you may not have to take off the exisiting roof in order to put a metal roof on, that it can just go over it. Our family tries to be concious about recycling and things like that, so I was curious as to how a roofer determines how much of your roof has to come off. My current roof, which is asphalt, is on its last legs, but it's not rotted out.
Guest User
3/28/2001
Hi, Tim. The videotape is correct. In most cases, your current roof won't have to be removed to place a metal one over it. But since every roof is different, it's hard for me to say without seeing yours personally if any of it has to be removed at all. Next time you're on the site, go to the Request a Contractor form. And when they come to your house to give you an estimate, they'll be able to tell you once they see it first-hand.
Guest User
4/11/2001
We are building a home in the spring of 2002 in cold wintery Manitoba Canada. We are planning to install a metal roof directly to the trusses using slats or ribs (I can't think of the proper word for the slats) running in the oposite direction of the trusses. This, I'm told, will offset the cost of the metal by not using wood decking. Here is the question. Some people said there will be a problem with condensation and moisture under the metal causing moisture damager to the insulation and trusses. How can this be prevented?
Guest User
4/17/2001
I have an old tin roof that has one layer of ashphalt roofing over it, there is nothing wrong with the current roof yet. Could a new metal roof go on over it?
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